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Quest For Trophy Rainbows

By Hugh Partridge, 🕔Mon, Mar 21st, 2011


  


As an avid fisherman of all species of fish in British Columbia, I am constantly on the lookout for new trophy fishing opportunities. It would appear that as with most dedicated sportsmen, I am constantly being asked, " Been fishing lately?"

This type of conversation often lends itself to me asking the very same question in return. Call it sharing information, or simply talking about fishing and the one that perhaps didn´t get away. It is like having an ear to the ground at all times, anticipating the opportunity to strike it big (no pun intended) in a new river, lake or saltwater destination.


The unfortunate fact about relying on insider information is often the source. After all, fishermen do tell lies—and those that don´t usually keep their mouths shut. I´ll never forget the time I drove for what seemed all day, down a twisting and winding dirt road, through pot holes and other obstacles, in search of five to six pound cutthroat trout that were rising to dry flies. It was a hot tip given to me by a good client. While the trout did eventually take dry flies, the average size turned out to be five to six inches.

Since the person who sent me down this wild goose chase was a close personal friend and co-angler, I didn´t want to burst his bubble by telling him the reality of his trophy lake. I simply went along with his story confirming that the fish were indeed five to six pounds each and proceeded to recommend that he fish a tiny lake located 50 miles further away that contained comparable trophy-sized fish (the slowest lake I have ever fished with only fingerling trout). We knew not to ever share fishing secrets from then on, and continued to successfully fish together at some proven trophy lakes.

My intention here is not to send you down a wild goose chase. Rather it is to share with you a lake of genuine trophy caliber, with rainbows that will make your chin drop. Really.

I stumbled upon the lake while asking a friend if he had been fishing. I was not quite sure what to say next, as he looked at me speechless, as though he was rehearsing his thoughts. The look on his face was the furthest thing from a poker face I have ever seen. It was a though there was a headline on his forehead—"Fisherman Lands Huge Fish and Lots of Them". No sooner than it took for me to utter the words, "Have you been fishing?" did it take for him to spill his tales of incredible fishing. What was different from any story about fishing that I have ever heard was in the proof. Yes, the proof really was in the pudding. Midway into his first sentence, he directed me to his VCR where he unveiled his videotape of rainbow trout fishing that only dreams are made of. I stood in utter amazement as four anglers caught over 15 massive, wide-girth, rainbows that were all well over four pounds. A large dragonfly hatch ensured their success once they successfully matched the hatch. While I can´t tell you exactly how big the largest rainbow was, I did recall watching the fish being landed with the lucky angler laughing once he realized that his net was to small to land the fish. My guess was that it was probably over 8 pounds.

With the newfound knowledge of the wondrous lake that awaited, the stage was set. A quick call to my respected co-angler and I was off to fish Forest Lake. Located in the northern region of British Columbia, just slightly north of Williams Lake, the lake was a small and picturesque.

We never did get into them like the anglers before us, but we did manage to collectively catch 6 fish ranging from three and a half to six pounds. A technically challenging lake with an artificial fly only restriction, our efforts pointed out that the anglers before us had obviously hit it just right.

We never did get into them like the anglers before us, but we did manage to collectively catch 6 fish ranging from three and a half to six pounds. A technically challenging lake with an artificial fly only restriction, our efforts pointed out that the anglers before us had obviously hit it just right.

While we had to work for our fish, these anglers before us could do no wrong that day they filmed the video. Still, Forest Lake proved to be a lake of real trophy caliber.

The point of this story besides sharing with you this special fishery, is that sometimes fisherman can tell the truth—and when they do, it pays to listen.


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